Oh Mosh

M O S H.
M E L B O U R N E.
G I R L.
D O I N G.
H E R.
T H I N G
afrikani:

Eleanor Xiniwe of the African Choir, 1891. Unseen for 120 years - a series of 30 images of the African Choir, a group of young South African singers that toured Britain between 1891 and 1893. Formed to raise funds for a Christian school in their home country they also performed for Queen Victoria on the Isle of Wight. At some point during their stay, they had group and individual portraits taken on plate-glass negatives. This long-lost series of photographs shows in London, September 2014. [Black Chronicles ii]


South African History - lost.

afrikani:

Eleanor Xiniwe of the African Choir, 1891. Unseen for 120 years - a series of 30 images of the African Choir, a group of young South African singers that toured Britain between 1891 and 1893. Formed to raise funds for a Christian school in their home country they also performed for Queen Victoria on the Isle of Wight. At some point during their stay, they had group and individual portraits taken on plate-glass negatives. This long-lost series of photographs shows in London, September 2014. [Black Chronicles ii]

South African History - lost.

(via carefreeblackgirls)

Kanye West Addresses His Critics

This is old but still so good!

(Source: youtube.com)

Ponytail Level: #fail #kanyethecat #catsofinstagram #instapet #intstacat #catgram #heletsmedothisbecausehelovesme

Ponytail Level: #fail #kanyethecat #catsofinstagram #instapet #intstacat #catgram #heletsmedothisbecausehelovesme

Thanks Mum! #textsfrommum #moshimonstors #clearlythisjokewillnevergetold #expectingthiscardformynextbirthday

Thanks Mum! #textsfrommum #moshimonstors #clearlythisjokewillnevergetold #expectingthiscardformynextbirthday

Read Kanye West’s Epic Rant Blasting the Media For ‘Wheelchair-Gate’

I won’t attempt to deny it… My bias runs thick when it come to Kanye West and if you’ve followed this Tumblr for even a day you would be able to see it.

I have followed his career perhaps a little bit closer than most, but that’s because I like to think I get it; get him. He is loud and visible, and makes no attempts to conceal his modesty which goes somewhat against the unwritten rules of being a celebrity.

But something else that he does and does really well is make music. The kind of music that beaks down social barriers and speaks directly to your soul regardless of who you are. The kind of barriers that brokered partnerships within hip hop and the rap community that didn’t exist before. 

10 years ago a rapper like Big Sean would not be signed to the same label or appear on the same album as an artist like Talib Kweli or Common. Artists like A$AP wouldn’t be stuntin’ at designer shows. He brought quality hip hop to the masses without making it corny and subsequently paved the way for so many other artists. And the whole time he told us his entire story.

He believes in himself and he believes in his fans.

I had the opportunity to see him perform for the 6th time last Tuesday in Melbourne and the crowd was so diverse that we even commented on how Kanye brings people together. He ranted to us. Encouraging us to not let people take us for granted. “Don’t fuck with me!”. He wanted us to chant this. 

Kanye is one of very few artists who knows his worth and uses it to empower his followers. He acknowledges that he is not perfect (its everywhere in his music) and has made mistakes. And having seen the video of the incident in Sydney - it has been completely blown out of proportion. I would encourage everyone everywhere to check it out and listen to some of his music before forming an opinion based on what you are told by the media.

~fin~

dynamicafrica:

"Black man, you are on your own" - Steve Biko (18 December 1946 – 12 September 1977).

September 12th, marks the day South Africa anti-Apartheid activist and Black Consciousness leader Steve Biko was killed in police custody in Pretoria. Biko had been arrested a month earlier in Port Elizabeth where he had been detained and tortured, resulting in him falling into a coma.

Nearly dead and suffering a serious and untreated head injury, Biko was transported to Pretoria by car and died shortly after his arrival at the prison there. Police at the time would claim and broadcast to the world that Biko died due to a hunger strike but an autopsy and photographs taken of Biko postmortem, exposed with the help of journalists Donald Woods and Helen Zille, revealed that he had died as a result of the injuries he sustained whilst in police custody.

Today, nearly 40 years after his death at age 30, we remember a man that fought for an end to the brutality he and countless others suffered and still do today. The fight is far from over.

A luta continua!

AMANDLA!